NZ'S FIRST WORLD WAR CENTENARY 2014–2019

Did you know?

Did you know that Rua Kēnana, a prominent Tūhoe leader, was arrested in 1916 for discouraging enlistment in the war?

Did you know that one hundred years ago, on 13 October 1915, the Niue Contingent of 150 men left their island to travel to New Zealand and join the war effort?

Did you know that the First World War servicemen of the British Empire staged the first international rugby tournament in 1919?

Did you know that after news of the casualty figures from Gallipoli arrived in New Zealand, the Maheno was converted from a trans-Tasman passenger liner to a hospital ship in less than a month?

Did you know that New Zealand troops began to return from overseas from as early as 1914 and that the last men didn’t return until 1921? Historian Imelda Bargas compares how these returning soldiers were welcomed home.

In the early stages of the war, between a quarter to a third of recruits were rejected for service on account of dental defects. Museum and Heritage Studies student Rebecca Nuttall explores the history of the New Zealand Dental Corps in the First World War.

Did you know that the Maori Contingent, which left New Zealand in February 1915, was the first organised effort by Māori to represent themselves in an overseas theatre of war?

While training in Egypt, the New Zealand troops came to be dubbed ‘Massey’s Tourists’ because of all the sightseeing and revelry in which they indulged.

Did you know that on 16 October 1914, the largest group of men ever to leave New Zealand departed for the First World War?

Did you know that New Zealanders named vast tunnel systems beneath the Western Front in Europe after places from home?

Did you know that the enemy at Gallipoli wasn't the 'Turks'?

When Britain declared war in August 1914, did this automatically mean New Zealand was also at war?

More than 100,000 pigeons are said to have served in the First World War, some from as far away as New Zealand.