NZ'S FIRST WORLD WAR CENTENARY 2014–2019

Personal stories

Getting a foothold in Palestine was more difficult than expected, as Trooper Vincent Barry of the Wellington Mounted Rifles found out at the First Battle of Gaza.

After conscription was introduced in 1916, nearly 100 people were imprisoned for opposing it. Some of them would go on to have notable political careers – none more so than future prime minister Peter Fraser.

Kirstie Ross, historian and curator at Te Papa, looks at the introduction and impact of military conscription 100 years ago.

The national war effort went beyond service in the armed forces. In these short personal stories, we look at some of the experiences of New Zealand's women at home during the war.

Risking death, injury and illness, Cook Islander Solomon Isaacs showed remarkable bravery and loyalty during three years fighting for his adopted country and the British Empire.

On 24 May 1915 the Anzacs and the Ottomans observed an armistice at Gallipoli to bury their dead in no-man's-land. What did the New Zealanders think about that day?

In an age of tweets and Facebook updates it can be difficult to conceive of a time when it took days, weeks or months to hear news.

“This is the shrapnel bullet which wounded me on 31/12/16...”. Sarah Lang tells the story of John James Jackson.