NZ'S FIRST WORLD WAR CENTENARY 2014–2019

News

01 November 2018

Canterbury Museum has launched an online version of its exhibition Canterbury and World War One: Lives Lost, Lives Changed.

01 November 2018

KiwiRail trains and Interislander ferries will take part in WW100's Roaring Chorus on November 11 to mark the Armistice Centenary.

01 November 2018

New Zealand to mark final major action of the First World War at Le Quesnoy in national commemoration.

30 October 2018

New Zealanders are responding on land and at sea to WW100’s call to create a Roaring Chorus to mark the centenary of the Armistice that ended the First World War in 1918.

29 October 2018

After touring New Zealand museums and sites of significance in Europe, the ‘Victory Medal’ sculpture is set to be unveiled in Le Quesnoy – site of New Zealand's last action on the Western Front.

11 October 2018

New Zealanders everywhere are invited on Sunday 11 November to commemorate 100 years since the signing of the Armistice that ended the First World War in 1918.

05 October 2018

The $650,000 Paul Dibble sculpture commemorating the First World War Featherston Military Camp — New Zealand’s largest military camp — will be dedicated on Saturday 10 November.

01 October 2018

From today, instead of receiving the usual 50 cent coin in your change, you may be lucky enough to receive a brand new Armistice Day coin of the same value.

13 September 2018

We're looking for an Advisor to help us to deliver the final phase of the First World War Centenary Programme.

11 September 2018

New Zealand will mark the centenary of its last significant action in the First World War with two ceremonies in France on 4 November 2018.

05 September 2018

You can now pre-order a limited number of the newly minted Armistice Day coins for delivery in October, right in time for Armistice Day.

14 August 2018

100 years ago, censorship restrictions in place during the First World War saw newspaper headlines portray disastrous battles like those at Gallipoli as decisive victories. A new campaign from WW100 puts wartime censorship itself under the spotlight.

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