Discover WW1

Did you know that Rua Kēnana, a prominent Tūhoe leader, was arrested in 1916 for discouraging enlistment in the war?

Seán Brosnahan – Curator at Toitū – recounts the story of the 100 year journey around the world of a dog tag belonging to Reinhold Fätsch, who went missing during the 1916 Battle of the Somme.

On the centenary of New Zealand's entry into the Somme, historian Ian McGibbon looks at the toll the battle took on the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, and the men who survived.

We look at several objects related to the Sinai Campaign to see how it differed from New Zealanders' experiences at Gallipoli and the Western Front.

The national war effort went beyond service in the armed forces. In these short personal stories, we look at some of the experiences of New Zealand's women at home during the war.

Following a mammoth fundraising effort, Joyce McKelvie was crowned Queen of the Rangītikei in an elaborate ceremony at Marton's town hall in September 1915.

During the Battle of Jutland in 1916, Captain John Green stood on the bridge of HMS New Zealand wearing a piupiu and hei tiki. These two items became good luck charms, credited with seeing the ship safely through the First World War’s largest naval battle.

Risking death, injury and illness, Cook Islander Solomon Isaacs showed remarkable bravery and loyalty during three years fighting for his adopted country and the British Empire.

Historian David Green explains how researchers recently revised the numbers of New Zealanders who served at Gallipoli.

Neill Atkinson, Chief Historian at Manatū Taonga – the Ministry for Culture and Heritage, asks how the commemoration of Anzac Day has changed since it was first observed in 1916.