NZ'S FIRST WORLD WAR CENTENARY20142019

Discover WW1

Following a mammoth fundraising effort, Joyce McKelvie was crowned Queen of the Rangītikei in an elaborate ceremony at Marton's town hall in September 1915.

During the Battle of Jutland in 1916, Captain John Green stood on the bridge of HMS New Zealand wearing a piupiu and hei tiki. These two items became good luck charms, credited with seeing the ship safely through the First World War’s largest naval battle.

Risking death, injury and illness, Cook Islander Solomon Isaacs showed remarkable bravery and loyalty during three years fighting for his adopted country and the British Empire.

Historian David Green explains how researchers recently revised the numbers of New Zealanders who served at Gallipoli.

Neill Atkinson, Chief Historian at Manatū Taonga – the Ministry for Culture and Heritage, asks how the commemoration of Anzac Day has changed since it was first observed in 1916.

How were Germans treated in New Zealand during the First World War?

Going to the movies was a favourite pastime for New Zealanders prior to the First World War, and over the course of the war it became even more popular. Ngā Taonga has preserved extracts of what New Zealanders would have watched one hundred years ago.

With tax hikes, bulk trade deals and heavy borrowing, the war’s most important long-term economic legacy for New Zealand was to increase both the size of the state and the scale of its intervention in the economy. The effects of this shift are still felt a century later.

After eight months of hardship, the New Zealanders’ occupation of Gallipoli came to an end in December 1915. What did the New Zealanders think about the withdrawal from Anzac?

On 24 May 1915 the Anzacs and the Ottomans observed an armistice at Gallipoli to bury their dead in no-man's-land. What did the New Zealanders think about that day?

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